The first of what will be a series of short books covering photographic related topics. Hopefully useful, sometimes thought provoking or at least interesting.
None will ever cost more than $5, but the first one is on me.

No-charge! Free! Nada! No-strings attached.

All I ask is that you provide me with some honest feedback in the comments below. Maybe even suggest a few topics you would like to see covered in future offerings. Maybe if you really like this one you might give me a follow on Instagram or Facebook?

Feel free to pass this on to a friend whom you think might find it interesting.

To receive your copy, simply head over my store.

This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. My apologies for this late reply.
    First, we need to agree on some terminology. “Micro” and “Macro” are generally considered to be interchangeable terms. I will use the more common “Macro”. “Macro photography” is generally assumed to begin at a magnification of 1:1, and include magnifications higher than this. A magnification of 1:1 results in an image of a subject, say 1 cm long reproducing as 1 cm. long on film or on your digital sensor. In this range we are talking about “a fly’s eye” kind of photography. However, long before we reach 1:1 there is a whole world of creative possibilities with “Close-up” photography. For example, the cover image on my eBook “Twelve Ways…”, is certainly in the realm of close up photography, but would not be considered true “macro”. There are a few more examples in my “A Closer Look” gallery (under “Images” above).
    Close-up photography is a perhaps simpler discipline… it doesn’t require much specialized equipment (you don’t even need a macro lens) It’s mostly about learning a few technical issues, being curious and thinking creatively.

    I’m not sure which discipline you are thinking of, true macro, or close-up photography as I describe here. If you are interested, I am working on another eBook that will be available in a month or so on Close-up photography; the equipment, technical skills and most importantly, on seeing potential subjects creatively.

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